Friday, May 3, 2013

48 States (plus...) in 10 days or less. Hmm...

I read Ron Ayres wonderful account of his Guiness Book ride...All lower 48 states in a record setting ride of 6 days, 0 hours and 5 minutes. Ron continued on to Hyder, Alaska to establish a new 49-state record of 7 days, 0 hours and 20 minutes. Wow!

If you haven't picked up one of Ron's books, I highly recommend you do. Good stuff, even for armchair Iron Butts.

There are numerous SAMPLE ROUTES from 48/10 riders available; I've come up with one of my own, as well (starting in a corner of Nevada).


I've attached a couple more from others to whet your appetites.



Here are the Iron Butt Association (IBA) rules and info: http://www.ironbutt.com/ridecerts/getdocument.cfm?DocID=19


In short, riders attempting to obtain certification for riding to 48 States in 10 Days ride (ride to all 48 continental United States of America) must adhere to the following rules:

You may take any route you wish to all 48 states, however the following is required:

In each State, you must ride to a city, town or community and document your visit (i.e., picture of "Welcome to State" sign is not acceptable).

Obtain a dated business receipt showing the name of city, town or community along with the STATE (this information should be pre-printed or computer generated, not hand written) and the business name. Most gasoline station receipts are acceptable.

Make a log entry showing date, time and odometer reading for each receipt.

Include a basic map of your route (an old map marked up is fine) so that we can follow your route. If you use SPOT messenger, SPOT maps are also great additional resources that should be included with your package.

It goes without sayinmg that "Only the most seasoned riders should attempt this ride."

Hey, I'm a seasoned rider!

OK, let the planning begin. What bike, when, which route? Ron started his ride in Maine; I lean toward Nevada or Oklahoma.

Questions, questions...

More to follow.

3 comments:

  1. I would cover the North East States first; this will allow me to choose the time to ride through. Then I would go south. Now, hit the open road to cover the big western states.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Did the car version...

    for a semblance of a round trip, "start" (counting) by Reno on CA/NV border and slalom around till you hit 4 corners and done (counting)... ~2k "dead miles" total if picking a starting point anywhere in Southern California

    Advantages: 2 big brutal stretches of wasteland "outside" the hard part, crossing Nevada towards Idaho being the first leg and where you're least likely to get stranded with a technical issue or out of gas 150mi from the nearest place with, you know, running water...and Four Corners to Joshua Tree being non-competitive limp-home miles.

    although that last bit of New Mexico DOES have the highest elevation (smthn like 13500 ft), best chance of black ice in summer, and a pretty mean last few miles to Four Corners if your tires brakes and suspension are barely holding together on prayer and duct tape type solutions...which they might well be, if your ride is pretty average and not engineered for endurance-performance

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good info! Whether on a bike or in a car, I think it would be a fun challenge.

      Delete